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HOLYROOD'S GREY WALLS AND THE NOBLE REMAINS OF ROYAL LINLITHGOW, RUINED IN THE '45

HOLYROOD'S GREY WALLS AND THE NOBLE REMAINS OF ROYAL LINLITHGOW, RUINED IN THE '45

Holyrood (bottom left) takes premier place among the royal palaces of Scotland. The tragic memories of ill-fated Mary Queen of Scots make its walls and rooms charged for ever with history. Linlithgow (top photographs) had its origin in a fort used as a hunting lodge. This was burned in the fifteenth century, and James IV, 1473-1513, who fell at Flodden, built the entrance (bottom right) and the west wing. But it is probable that before this the old fort had been extended into something which might have been called a palace. The north wing was erected by James VI in 1620. The present ruinous state is due to the sack which the palace underwent by English troops under Henry Hawley, commander-in-chief in Scotland during 1745.

Other pictures from Where Kings and Queens Kept State


GREAT HALL OF ELTHAM AND SCONE OF THE SCOTTISH KINGS

BEDROOM OF MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS, AT HOLYROOD

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